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Capitals Jaw Dropping Defense of Tom Wilson Hit
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Capitals Jaw Dropping Defense of Tom Wilson Hit

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Tom Wilson: Photo by Michael Miller.

It may come as a slight surprise to some but the Washington Capitals are vigorously defending their serial headhunter, Tom Wilson who was ejected for a blindside hit on Brett Seney late in the second period of the Capitals 6-3 win over the New Jersey Devils, Friday night. Wilson immediately received a match penalty and the Capitals organization immediately began their defense.

As Seney laid injured on the ice.

UPDATE 11:00 a.m.: The NHL announced Wilson will not be suspended for the hit. 

During the second period intermission, Capitals TV analyst Alan May said, “That’s embarrassing that it’s even a call; a two-minute penalty, but let alone a five-minute penalty. I think it’s disgusting. Really, the Capitals should be upset as an organization, top to bottom. There’s no way [it’s a penalty].”

Click here for the full story and comments published by NBC Sports Washington.

And here is the hit and Capitals locker room reaction, including coach Todd Reirden who said, “I’m having a really tough time with this one.”

Injured? You need a lawyer. Call Joshua R. Lamm.

But Reirden’s tough time wasn’t a reference to being disappointed in his player, his “tough time” was that a penalty was called. Seriously. Here is the full locker room reaction and Reirden’s postgame comments, too:

With respect to a lot of good people in and around the Capitals organization, the only thing embarrassing is the employment of Tom Wilson. The hockey community shamed the Pittsburgh Penguins for paychecks to Matt Cooke, nearly a decade ago and those ended. To their credit, the Penguins responded appropriately.

The Penguins did not argue that headshots were not penalties or that avoidable contact was “incidental.”

The Capitals signed Wilson, 24, to a six-year, $31 million contract this summer. Their 2012 first-round pick has been coming into his own, offensively. He had 13 points (7g, 6a) in nine games before the hit.

While most players can go seasons, or an entire career without delivering such a hits, Wilson could not go 10 games without delivering a sneaky shot. He lasted a total of 25 periods before he again lost his head and put his shoulder into someone else’s head.

Every replay angle shows an entirely avoidable contact. If their feet became tangled, Veney wouldn’t have laid on the ice, dazed. Instead, Wilson took the opportunity to plow through the shoulders, head, and neck of an unsuspecting player who was not eligible to be hit.

Since an independent arbitrator reduced Wilson’s 20 game suspension, which he received for a vicious headshot on Oskar Sundqvist in the preseason, to 14 games, the NHL may be forced to abide by that formula. The arbitrator ruled the NHL’s suspension was too harsh because the league applied a multiplier of 3x because it was Wilson’s fourth suspension. The arbitrator reduced the multiplier to 2x.

If the NHL uses a 3x multiplier on this suspension, it could be 42 games.

The NHL called Wilson’s rate of suspensions “unprecedented,” in October. It now appears Wilson is going deeper into uncharted territory, even if the Capitals don’t think it was a penalty.

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Pittsburgh Hockey Now owner, formerly 93.7 The Fan, Sportsnet Hockey Tonight. Catch Dan tweeting @theDanKingerski and the official @pghhockeynow account.

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. LettenItAllHang

    December 2, 2018 at 1:21 am

    I believe the extensive coverage of how this particular hit is horrendous is asinine. If you feel a player is a “headhunter” or an all around dirty player and needs to be removed from the game, don’t scrutinize every move he makes. Let him make the truly egregious hits and ask for his head.

    This hit was, at the very worst, an interference minor. Seney is facing up ice (the direction Wilson is coming from) and turns to dump the puck back. Wilson (a defensive player at the time as his team was in their own zone) is following the puck. With his speed (he was coming in from behind the play, just starting his shift) and the reverse ANGLE that Seney was skating at caused their paths to cross, unintentionally.

    The keys to this play are that Wilson is gliding (not looking for full contact) and Wilson adjusts his weight to avoid contact as Seney’s backwards glide was angled into Wilson’s path.

    This is honestly an incidental contact hockey play. Anybody else and this would not be controversial.

    • Dan Kingerski

      December 2, 2018 at 8:17 am

      Instead of us arguing it, long time referee Paul Stewart also weighed in:
      Paul Stewart tweet

      • LettenItAllHang

        December 2, 2018 at 11:21 am

        The Tweet in your reply is not loading. Is it the same one you ended this article with?

  2. Dave

    December 2, 2018 at 9:54 am

    Instead of us arguing about what paul Stewart said, let’s watch Wilson play this afternoon!

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