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Penguins Takeaways: ‘We Got Outplayed,’ Slow, Sloppy Loss to EDM

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Pittsburgh Penguins, Edmonton Oilers

EDMONTON, Alberta — The Pittsburgh Penguins cured their poor start ills. However, they traded a good start for terrible second and third periods. The Edmonton Oilers looked like world beaters even without a point from Connor McDavid and took the Penguins to the woodshed, 6-3 at Rogers Place.

The game was a battle of the top lines and top pairings. It was also a game decided by the Penguins’ puck management angels against their inner demons.

Their inner demons won.

The Penguins decidedly lost.

“We got outplayed,” coach Mike Sullivan said before a long pause. “I thought we had a really good start. The first period was really strong. That was an area we knew we had to get better at … We got outplayed from there.”

Get the Penguins postgame here.

Pittsburgh Penguins Takeaways:

1. Turnovers, Turnovers, and More Turnovers

The Penguins’ turnovers were not necessarily born of overwhelming Edmonton pressure, but many inexplicably sloppy passes into shin pads, into coverage, and holding onto the puck longer than necessary.

“Right now, we are (too high risk),” said Sullivan.

” … There’s a certain discipline to manage the puck the right way. One of the easiest ways to beat yourself is to mismanage the puck and give teams easy looks. We’re just not diligent with the puck right now.”

Scorers gave Edmonton 20 takeaways and the Penguins 10 giveaways. That’s 30 pucks given away, 30 plays nullified, and 30 possessions turned over.

Tristan Jarry was little more than a plate spinner trying to stop 47 shots, including 38 in the final two periods. 

2. Soft Play

“We just got on our heels. We didn’t forecheck well,” Sidney Crosby said. “We gave them some time and space, and they’re a dangerous team. So you give them time and space, they’re going make plays.”

The Penguins were not a hard team to play against on Monday. After trading chances early in the second period, Edmonton lived on the rush while the Penguins chased the game. The Penguins lacked a gritty or urgent component that tried to slow Edmonton.

Edmonton didn’t have to dump the puck or chase. They had free passes across the blue line into the Penguins’ zone.

2. Letang & Dumoulin

The Edmonton Oilers turned Dumoulin inside out. Hung him out to dry. Then folded him and put him away. It was, perhaps, the worst game Dumoulin has played in a Penguins sweater.

He was walked a few times, including by Evander Kane and Leon Draisaitl.

Kris Letang was uncharacteristically out of position. A few Oilers got behind him, including Zach Hyman, on the first goal.

They were minus-3.

Letang had a 24% shot attempt ratio (Corsi). Dumoulin clocked in at 21%.

3. Fourth Line

Swallowed Hole. For good reasons, the Penguins’ fourth line didn’t get much ice time. They were on the wrong side of the puck early in the game and never recovered.

Ryan Poehling was in single digits until late in the game. He has played well in the first five games, but he was on the ice for just two shot attempts and a staggering 17 against on Monday.

4. Ricard Rakell Rocked PP2

When the Penguins were on their game, way back in the first period, Rickard Rakell ran PP2 with a masterful touch. The Penguins’ second unit accounted for the first Penguins’ goal, as well as crisp, clean puck movement. Rakell and the second unit worked the puck around the zone and back to Rakell, who had clean ice in front of him.

He was able to take a couple of strides forward before snapping a hard shot past goalie Jack Campbell.

5. Petry & Pettersson

We promised not to judge Jeff Petry until December. However, against Montreal and Edmonton, two teams that play fast, Petry was in the penalty box because he was behind the play.

One of those times was behind McDavid (understandable), but Petry interfered with McDavid, sending the star center crashing into the net and boards.

The Penguins need Petry to be in a better position against fast teams. They play a few of them in the Metro Division.

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Pittsburgh Hockey Now Editor-in-Chief, formerly 93.7 The Fan, Sportsnet Hockey Tonight, NHL Home Ice. Catch Dan tweeting @theDanKingerski and the official @pghhockeynow account.

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DaGama
DaGama
1 month ago

Takeaway: Jarry started acting like Ron Hextall the player thus waking the Oilers and the building.

Eric Bouchard
Eric Bouchard
1 month ago

Can someone tell Jarry to stay focused on making saves. Be a GOALIE only . Stop the damn Junior stuff, Grabbing the stick of one guy. Slew foot Draisatl etc..
his crease he often acts up WAY too much. Every referees will see this and he will never get a CALL when he will need one.

GROW up Tristan.

Phil
Phil
1 month ago
Reply to  Eric Bouchard

Wow that was a the most ridiculous comment I have read yet. I think hes focused on making saves. And jarry is a very good goalie. You have no personal knowledge of his mind set or thinking. You dont know him and you dont spend time around him. To tell him to grow up lol. Really? Have you ever played professional hockey as a goalie? I think he knows what hes doing as do the coaches. So it’s okay this in jarry we trust!

Last edited 1 month ago by Phil
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[…] Edmonton Oilers turned it up, and the Penguins were in trouble. Here are five takeaways from the Pittsburgh Penguins’ 6-3 […]

Sjf928
Sjf928
1 month ago

So Letang was “uncharacteristically out of position?” I can’t remember a game where he has been in the right position for the majority of time. For all his speed, he got walked around several times against Montreal to go along with several bad giveaways. He brings a lot offensively but this narrative that he is a complete defenseman is just not true!

Uros
Uros
1 month ago

Very good assessment of Petry’s play up until now. I will be patient as you suggest, but he did not come cheap. One does expect more for that amount. As for Jarry, he got stabbed by Kane and reacted, rightly so. The Draisatl one I struggle to understand.