Bowser Automotive
Olli Määttä's Encouraging Development Opens Up Possibilities
Connect with us

Penguins

Olli Määttä’s Encouraging Development Opens Up Possibilities

He’s but 23 years old, but he’s already seen both sides of the hype cycle in professional sports.

Published

on

Michael Miller (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0]

Olli Määttä is but 23 years old, but he’s already seen both sides of the hype cycle in professional sports.

What goes up will probably go down, and maybe even back up again.

Määttä appeared to be a star in the making after the 2013-14 season, in which the native Finn posted nine goals and 29 points. He finished fifth in rookie of the year voting and there was reason to believe he’d be a fixture on the Penguins’ blue line for a decade or more.

Then came the health problems, headlined by the bout with thyroid cancer early in this second season. That was followed in the span of a year by two shoulder surgeries and a violent fall into the boards caused by a questionable Nino Niederreiter check. He bounced back late in the 2015-16 season, eventually averaging over 20 minutes a night during that year’s run to the Stanley Cup.

But after an injury-shortened 2016-17 that saw Määttä submit his worst offensive output (seven points in 55 games) and his worst relative shot-share numbers (minus-2.5 percent compared to team) of his NHL career. That contract that pays him $4.083 million annually through 2021-22 was looking rather onerous at this time last summer.

Then, Jim Rutherford signed Justin Schultz to a three-year contract ($5.5 million salary) and Brian Dumoulin to a six-year deal ($4.1 million salary). Määttä was officially the Penguins’ fourth-highest-paid defensemen heading into last season, and it could’ve been argued that status was generous.

Injured? You need a lawyer. Call Joshua R. Lamm.

Timely Transformation

Now, we can sit here following Määttä’s resurgent 2017-18 and wonder if he and the 26-year-old Dumoulin are the new leaders of the Pittsburgh defense corps.

Kris Letang‘s season-long performance in his return from neck surgery didn’t inspire a ton of confidence, and Schultz suffered a year-to-year dip in points per game (from 0.65 in 2016-17 to 0.43) and relative shot share (from plus-1.9 percent to minus-2.1). Those guys aren’t without value, but it’s not a stretch to call Dumoulin and Määttä the team’s two most reliable defenders heading into 2018-19.

If that’s the case, then the Penguins are in good shape in regards to the salary cap. Both men could be expected to maintain their level for the next couple of years, and they cost just over $8 million annually. With the cap rising in the neighborhood of $80 million for next season, that’s not much to pay two top-four defenders.

And as I wrote with regards to Dumoulin last month, Määttä added some offensive thrust to his usual game in 2017-18. While playing all 82 games for the first time in his five-year career, Määttä was notably more aggressive in firing the puck. He averaged 3.9 shot attempts per game, a significant increase over his previous career high of 3.1 in his rookie season and an even bigger leap from the 2.6 he averaged during the three seasons in between.

Määttä kept up the pace in the playoffs, shooting 3.5 times per game, but that wasn’t the only encouraging development from the Penguins’ No. 3. Per game-tracking data complied by Corey Sznajder, Määttä had the Penguins’ second-best exit rate on defensive zone breakouts, behind only Dumoulin.

Best of Both Worlds?

In other words, Määttä was both reliable in his own end and played a more integral role in the attacking zone, all of which opens up more options for Rutherford in his attempt to keep the Penguins a viable Cup contender.

For one, the Penguins could simply roll over the defense corps into next season and plan on giving Määttä more of a workload. An extra minute or two per night could both increase his positive influence on the team while simultaneously taking a little bit of strain off Letang in his early 30s. Määttä can’t skate like Letang — not even close, really — but he can surely shoulder a little more ice time.

Furthermore, if the Penguins want to give Matt Hunwick another shot in the fall, Määttä was one of the few players with which Hunwick posted a positive shot share in 2017-18. Hunwick got a full 3 percent boost with Määttä compared to without It’s questionable that Hunwick can handle top-four minutes at this stage of his career, but that pairing is an option.

Finally, Määttä’s growth could create more trade-related possibilities during a summer that will likely see Rutherford make at least one deal. Are the Penguins’ more likely to dangle Letang out there now? Could Määttä himself be available in order to help the team replenish its depth?

Don’t rule anything out, even though it strikes this commentator that Määttä is the type of player one hangs onto. Much like with Dumoulin, the Penguins’ faith in Määttä, manifest in that six-year contract signed in Feb. 2016, is looking more appropriate by the day.

That’s a positive, regardless of what happens from this point forward.

Subscribe to PHN Extra

A lifelong hockey addict, Matt has been fortunate enough to make his career in his sport of choice, working in high school, juniors, college and the pros in various multimedia roles. Previous to joining PHN, Matt was a credentialed Penguins/NHL beat reporter for the past two seasons, including coverage of the 2017 Stanley Cup Final. He signed on with PHN in Feb. 2018 as co-owner, contributing commentary and analysis in various forms.

7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. JICS

    June 12, 2018 at 7:06 pm

    We should have never had Hunwick, let alone keep him for another try, in my opinion. That goes for Simon, too. Surely they could have dumped him in some deal, instead of on the first line to ruin the production there.

  2. JICS

    June 12, 2018 at 7:18 pm

    I would love to have seen what would have happened if we had kept Cole and Reaves, brought Sprong up for the 1st line, not had 2 players out. That caused us to play 2 games short a player for the best part of a game, and lose Aston-Reese for good. If Sullivan had played Reaves like he should have and let him put the Tom Wilsons in their place (may have saved those 2 bad hits). So many say that Reaves didn’t do anything when he could only do what the Coach allowed, or commissioned him to. I really don’t feel that OV would be going around acting like such a goon if that were the case – maybe, maybe not – but at least we would have had a chance. I’m OK with losing if we put the best out there, but it’s pretty sad the way it happened!

  3. Rich Filardi

    June 15, 2018 at 2:13 pm

    IMO-the best way to open up cap space and bring assets in is to trade Letang-you will never have a better opportunity than now because he is healthy -which is risky for him more than others as history dictates- hope Rutherford doesn’t miss this opportunity.

  4. Pingback: Pittsburgh Penguins Are Seeing Results of Ray Shero's Draft Day Moves

  5. Pingback: Penguins Seeing Results of Shero’s Draft Day Moves - Betting101.com

  6. Pingback: Penguins Seeing Results of Shero’s Draft Day Moves - Hockey News

  7. Pingback: Pittsburgh Penguins Are Seeing Results of Ray Shero's Draft Day Moves - Hockey Globe

Make your voice heard

Get PHN Extra

PHN Extra

Never Miss a Post!

Enter your email to get all of our articles sent straight to your inbox.

%d bloggers like this:

Join PHN Extra!

Join PHN Extra today for exclusive content from Dan and Shelly plus a completely Google ad-free experience.

PHN Extra

Or enter your email below to sign-up for our mailing list.

Thank you!

Something went wrong.

No thanks. I don't want.

Send this to a friend